10:45-12:15

Keynote: 

We Do Language: Valuing Student Voices in North Carolina Schools

Dr. Christine Mallinson


Associate Professor Language, Literacy, and Culture              

UMBC

When author and professor Toni Morrison gave the Nobel Lecture after accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993, she explained the centrality of language to our daily lives: “We die. That may be the meaning of life,” Morrison said. “But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives.” Our students and our children “do language” every day, in nuanced and complex ways that reflect their identities, families, communities, and cultures. This presentation will discuss how to value and develop students’ unique voices while building their academic confidence. Educators will learn about language diversity and how to guide their students to become language investigators who understand the power and significance of language. As students develop insight into and appreciation for the nuances of language, as they learn to communicate effectively, and as they work to understand diverse modes of expression, they acquire and hone the linguistic skills that are not only central to academic advancement but that are also valued in our multicultural and technology-driven 21st century society.

12:15-1:15

Interactive Small Group Lunch

 

During lunch, you will have the opportunity to do a discussion activity focusing on a topic of your choice.  Tables will be set up with activities such as:

  • ·         Vocabulary building with foldables
  • ·         International math solutions
  • ·         Myth busters
  • ·         Questions I have about teaching my ELLs                                                                       (to be answered during the wrap up session at 4pm)
  • ·         Social context of language discussion group

1:15-2:45


Breakout Session I

Presenter

 


Dr. Kristin Papoi

Clinical Assistant Professor        

School of Education UNC-Chapel Hill


Teaching ELLs in Elementary

With an increasing population of ELLs in mainstream classes, elementary teachers are looking for ways to ensure that all of their students are successful learners.  This session will focus on strategies that enable ELLs to grasp the content being taught in your class.  Participants will gain a deeper understanding of their role as a language teacher within all K-5 subject areas. By the end of the session, participants can expect to have added to their repertoire of strategies for effectively teaching ELLs.

Intended Audience: Elementary Teachers and Administrators

 


Dr. Lori Edmonds

Clinical Assistant Professor        

School of Education UNC-Chapel Hill


Teaching ELLs in Secondary Content Areas

With an increasing population of ELLs in content-area classes, secondary teachers are looking for ways to ensure that all of their students are successful learners.  This session will focus on strategies that enable ELLs to grasp the content being taught in your class.  Participants will gain a deeper understanding of their role as a language teacher within their subject area. By the end of the session, participants can expect to have added to their repertoire of strategies for effectively teaching ELLs.

Intended Audience:  Secondary Teachers and Administrators

   2:55-3:55


Breakout Session II

Presenter

 

Dr. Kristin Papoi

Clinical Assistant Professor        

School of Education UNC-Chapel Hill


Creating a pedagogy of participation:  Arts-integration practices for ELs

This session will explore how arts-based practices provide elementary English learners (ELs) with equitable access to rich sense-making opportunities that positively influence learning and socioemotional outcomes. The session will give examples from a study of two comparative cases: a narrative theatre arts residency in Chicago called Barrel of Monkeys, and an arts integration case in a bilingual Los Angeles school using materials from makerspace Trash for Teaching.  The session will explore the study’s key findings of how arts-based practices foster a pedagogy of participation, promote iterative group work, and use sensemaking as tool for student and teacher assessment. Each case is illustrated by vivid student-created artifacts such as writing and photographs of two- and three-dimensional artwork. Participants will leave with actionable ideas of how to integrate arts-based practices in the elementary classroom to foster language for EL through questioning, exploration of materials, and employing a “pedagogy of participation”.

Intended Audience:  Elementary Teachers and Administrators

 


Dr. Brian Gibbs

Assistant Professor

School of Education UNC-Chapel Hill


Art as Intellectual Work in the Social Studies

Abstract:

Making art, like essays, primary sources, and discussion has strong academic and intellectual merit. This session makes this argument and shows participants how to do art as rigorous pedagogy.

 

Objectives:

The objective of this session is to help participants view student construction of art as a worthwhile intellectual, academic, and rigorous part of social studies learning. Like the writing of an essay, the analysis of primary source documents, or participation in a rich classroom discussion, art, pushes students to think critically, analyze, use information well, make and support an argument in a complex and complicated format. Participants will be exposed to this argument as well as learn ways to embed the making of art into their every day practice. Participants will learn how to use art for analysis but also how to have students use art in large and small ways as part of developing a point of view, making and supporting an argument and communicating within a different medium.

 

Contents/Skills:

Participants will learn how to have their students make and use art--specifically the visual medium of art. Participants will learn how to develop art based social studies assignments, assessments and projects for teams of students and individuals. They will learn how use the making of art to deepen content understanding, grow intellectual and academic skills and processes as well as how to assess art when students have completed and presented it.

Intended Audience:  High School


Carolina Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages
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